Saudi Ties to US Universities Under Question Amid Khashoggi Crisis

As Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan urges Saudi Arabia to disclose who ordered the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, we end today’s show looking at how US universities are facing new scrutiny over their close ties to Saudi Arabia in the wake of Khashoggi’s murder. In Connecticut, activists are calling on the University of New Haven to cut ties to King Fahd Security College in Saudi Arabia. According to news reports, the Saudi forensic doctor who allegedly dismembered Khashoggi’s body served on the editorial board of a publication tied to King Fahd Security College. Dr. Salah Muhammed al-Tubaigy’s name was removed from the publication’s website this week. A forensic scientist from the University of New Haven served on the editorial board with him. We speak to Stanley Heller, executive director of the Middle East Crisis Committee, and Harvard Medical School fellow Yarden Katz.

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now! I’m Amy Goodman. As Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan urges Saudi Arabia to discuss who ordered the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, we end today’s show looking at how US universities are facing new scrutiny over their close ties to Saudi Arabia in the wake of Khashoggi’s murder. Earlier this year, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman visited both Harvard and M.I.T. on his first official tour to the US. Ahead of the meeting, M.I.T. students presented their university’s president, Rafael Reif, with a stack of petitions protesting bin Salman’s visit.

M.I.T. STUDENT: We’re here because we want to urge President Reif to reconsider the meeting with Mohammed bin Salman. We are aware that this meeting is going to happen, but we feel that accepting resources from somebody in sort of a blanket way, without acknowledging that there is a substantial famine being caused by Mohammed bin Salman in Yemen, goes against the principles of M.I.T., which is wanting to maintain human rights.

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