Why Does Anyone Need These?

One of the cornerstones of being prepared is to identify items that multitask and to embrace their use during normal times.  Doing so not only saves money but also saves storage space and eliminates having to choose which product or item to use for what.

A good example is the common Mason jar.  Another is the flour sack dishtowel.

I was chatting with Backdoor Survival reader, Susan Perry, about this very same thing when she offered to share her top twenty-five uses for flour sack towels.  How cool is that?

I grew up around flour sack dishtowels.  I remember how my grandmother used them for everything including cleaning rags, aprons, and tidy little bundles holding dry goods. I had forgotten about them until ten years ago when I saw a package at Wal-Mart.  There was no looking back and I still use those same towels today.  I even embroidered them myself with colorful little cabins.

Why are the most advertised Gold and Silver coins NOT the best way to invest?

What the Heck are Flour Sack Dishtowels?



Aunt Martha’s 28-Inch …
Buy New $13.19

As a homesteader, I’m all about quality when it comes to basic supplies, and as a herbalist who also loves cooking from scratch, that goes double in the kitchen. I discovered years ago that when it comes to kitchen towels, flour sacks are the only way to go.

Although the term might provoke an image of rough, dusty, oversized rags, they are quite the opposite. They’re super absorbent, lint free, and vastly superior to the decorative towels you might find at a department store.

A Short History of Flour Sack Towels

It all started back in the 1850’s. Those old wooden barrels were heavy and bulky. Cotton had become inexpensive, so grain mills began shipping flour in large, thick cotton bags strong enough to hold…

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