Why Do Senators Jeanne Shaheen and Todd Young Want to Continue Starving Yemeni Children?

A Yemeni child carried by his mother waits to receive vaccine against diphtheria disease at a health center on March 13, 2018 in Sana'a, Yemen. (Photo: Mohammed Hamoud / Getty Images)A Yemeni child carried by his mother waits to receive vaccine against diphtheria disease at a health center on March 13, 2018, in Sana’a, Yemen. (Photo: Mohammed Hamoud / Getty Images)

A Senate vote is expected within days on the Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont)-Mike Lee (R-Utah)-Chris Murphy (D-Connecticut) bill (S.J.Res.54) ending the US’s unauthorized participation in the catastrophic Saudi war in Yemen. Ending US participation will end the war and save millions of Yemenis now living on the brink of famine as a direct and deliberate result of the US-backed Saudi war and the US-backed Saudi blockade of food, medicine and fuel from entering Yemen through its Red Sea ports like Hodeida that supply the capital, Sana. The Saudi war and blockade have produced the largest humanitarian crisis in the world, including the worst cholera crisis since records have been kept.

Current co-sponsors of the Sanders-Lee-Murphy bill include Sens. Dick Durbin (D-Illinois), Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts), Cory Booker (D-New Jersey), Ed Markey (D-Massachusetts), Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont), Dianne Feinstein (D-California) and Ron Wyden (D-Oregon).

The United States has crucially supported the catastrophic Saudi-UAE war in Yemen in multiple ways. The US has armed the Saudis and Emiratis for their war. Together with Theresa May’s government in the UK, the US has given the catastrophic Saudi-UAE war diplomatic cover at the United Nations, helping prevent the UN Security Council from even discussing a Security Council resolution that would order an unconditional ceasefire and an end to the Saudi blockade. But the US is also refueling the Saudi and UAE planes during their bombing runs and providing them targeting information. These last two things — the refueling and targeting — directly implicate Congressional war powers.

Under Article I of the Constitution, reaffirmed by the War Powers Resolution in 1973, Congress, not the President, decides when to authorize the use of force if the United States…

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