The Case Against Political Ambition

When you’re in the position of nearly 9 million New Yorkers, where your mayor and your governor hate each other, you wonder what it would take to bring them together. If you’re one of those New Yorkers, where your two top leaders are planning on presidential bids, you’re waiting for the rhetoric to start. Just days after the end of the 2018 general election, it did.

All of a sudden, in a city with a crumbling infrastructure, where public housing has a lead crisis, and the rent is still too damn high, we’re talking about jobs. Speaking to Brian Lehrer in mid-November, the Bernie Sanders-endorsed mayor who has told us he’s a progressive as many times as he’s told us he’s a Mets fan, he sounded like he was John Kasich stumping in upstate New York.

When you’re working at an office, you can’t go up to your boss or the people who sign your check, and tell them that you’re interviewing for other jobs. No matter who you are at a company, this kind of talk will drive stock prices, morale, and the future of your company down the drain.  It’s likely that you’d lose your job because of this.

So why is it legal for our elected officials to hold an office while they travel the country, absent from their job, trying to interview for another office? Why do we encourage those elected officials we like to slack off from their jobs, aim higher, and inject broad rhetoric into their platform?

I’d like to argue for why it should be illegal to run for another…

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