Co-plaintiffs criticize German federal prosecutor and secret service in neo-Nazi NSU trial

 

Co-plaintiffs criticize German federal prosecutor and secret service in neo-Nazi NSU trial

By
Justus Leicht and Dietmar Henning

24 November 2017

Lawyers for the relatives and victims of the terrorist attacks carried out by the neo-Nazi National Socialist Underground (NSU) are conducting their final arguments in the court case against the remaining member of the NSU. The NSU is accused of killing nine immigrants and a policewoman, and of carrying out two bombings—in 2001 and 2004—and over two dozen bank robberies. The main accused is allegedly the sole surviving member of the NSU, Beate Zschäpe. Four other neo-Nazis are charged with aiding and abetting.

The plaintiff’s initial closing arguments sharply criticized the Federal Prosecutor’s Office, which, along with the court, insisted that the NSU consisted of only three perpetrators (two of whom are dead) and a few supporters.

In his closing argument, Federal Prosecutor Herbert Diemer aggressively rejected any criticism of this determination, dismissing it as the “ buzzing of flies ” in a thinly veiled insult to the victims of the neo-Nazi terrorist attack and their relatives. Immediately after the crime, the police focused their investigation on the families of the victims and repeatedly excluded any racist motive for the bombings.

In her closing argument, attorney Edith Lunnebach pointed to the close involvement of state agencies, particularly the secret service, with the NSU. Lunnebach represents Mashia M., the daughter in a family of Iranian origin that was the target of the 2001 bomb attack in Cologne’s Probsteigasse.

Mashia’s father, a shop owner, described how the attack was perpetrated. In the run-up to Christmas 2000, he said, a man had come into his shop whom he had never seen before. The small,…

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