Canada’s Respect for the Rule of Law and Its Sacred Obligation to First Nations

It is time for a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations peoples, one that understands that the constitutionally guaranteed rights of First Nations in Canada are not an inconvenience but rather a sacred obligation.

— Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau speaking to First Nation leaders, 8 December 2015

In Part 1, it was noted that Canadian politicians repeatedly claim that Canada is a nation bound by the rule of law.

People can claim whatever they want; that does not make the claim true. Likewise anyone can pooh-pooh a claim. But that doesn’t refute the claim. Bogus claims are revealed by providing sufficient evidence to counter the deceit.

Although there are myriad examples to adduce that Canada is not a country bound by the rule of law, this article will focus on one current example.

It is important to first acknowledge the irrefutable fact that Canada is a nation established through the denationalization of other states. This was wrought by genocide and dispossession.

Canada’s Respect for the Rule of Law and the Wet’suwet’en

Located in the central interior of the province colonially designated British Columbia are the people of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation. Coastal GasLink considers this terrain as the most suitable to lay a pipeline. This, though, has not received the consent of the Dinï ze’ and Ts’akë ze’ (Hereditary chiefs); in fact, the proposal from Coastal Gaslink was unanimously turned down.

However, a recent…

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