A Zombie Rises, A Spook Falls

Instead of participating in a televised gathering of un-dead presidents and plutocrats for a Deep State funeral, we should be watching ‘Dead of Night’ (1974). It’s hard to think of another film that so precisely (and presciently) envisioned the unintended consequences of war, namely its pox on casualties and survivors alike.

So just what does a low-budget zombie flick from more than forty years ago have to do with a recently entombed former President? Or even a long-serving Senator who defied death in Vietnam and returned home to haunt the corridors of power as a lifeless, bloodthirsty lawmaker? We can compare the legacy of the late John McCain and now George H.W. Bush with a horror master’s interpretation of their handiwork in this life and beyond.

Tragically, not much has changed in the almost 50 years since Bob Clark’s Dead of Night was released as a ‘B’ chiller with an antiwar message delivered with blunt force: A young American soldier dies in Vietnam and returns home, seemingly and miraculously alive to his elated parents just hours after they receive the news of his death. His besotted, overbearing mother’s prayers for his return become an accursed incantation that compels the corpse to rise from its disturbed, primordial burial ground.

Be careful of what you wish for: Liberating a spirit from his own muddy grave has roughly the same consequences of “liberating” a nation from their villages and rice paddies. Or for that matter, their gas and…

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