Water Protectors at Standing Rock React to Obama's Intervention in Dakota Access Pipeline Battle

In a dramatic series of moves on Friday, the White House intervened in the ongoing fight against the Dakota Access pipeline, less than an hour after a federal judge rejected the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s request for an injunction against the US government over the pipeline. “It’s not a solid victory now but just the weight, feeling that weight that I’ve been carrying for the last couple months is lifting. I feel like I could breathe right now,” says Floris White Bull. We feature the reactions to government’s intervention from some of the thousands of Native Americans who have gathered along the Cannonball River by the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation to resist the pipeline’s construction.

TRANSCRIPT

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: We begin today’s show with major updates in the fight by Native Americans to stop the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which would carry about 500,000 barrels of crude oil a day from the Bakken oil fields of North Dakota through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. The project has faced months of resistance from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and members of hundreds of other tribes from across the United States and Canada who flocked to North Dakota in what’s being described as the largest unification of Native American tribes in decades.

In a dramatic series of moves late Friday afternoon, a federal judge rejected the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s request for an injunction against the US government over the Dakota Access pipeline. Then, the Army, the Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior responded with a joint announcement that the Army Corps will not issue permits for Dakota Access to drill under the Missouri River until the Army Corps reconsiders its previously issued permits. In a statement, the Department of Justice said, quote, “(c)onstruction of the pipeline on Army Corps land bordering or under Lake Oahe will not go forward at this time,” unquote. The federal…

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