Candidates for Sale

What do Obama and McCain have in common? The same big donors, who will expect to have their way no matter who wins

Remember the total, hideous, inexcusable absence of oversight that has been the great hallmark of George Bush’s America for almost eight years now? Well, now we’re getting to see that same regulatory malfeasance applied to yet another cornerstone of our political system. The Federal Election Commission – the body that supposedly enforces campaign-finance laws in this country – has been out of business for more than six months. That’s because Congress was dragging its feet over confirmation hearings for new FEC commissioners, leaving the agency without a quorum. The commission just started work again for the first time on July 10th under its new chairman, Donald McGahn, a classic Republican Party yahoo whose chief qualifications include representing Tom DeLay, the corrupt ex-speaker of the House, in matters of campaign finance.

Apart from the obvious absurdity of not having a functioning election-policing mechanism in an election year in the world’s richest democracy, the late start by the FEC makes it almost impossible for the agency to do its job. The commission has a long-standing reluctance to take action in the last months before a vote, a policy designed to help prevent federal regulators from influencing election outcomes. Normally, the FEC tries to root out infractions and loopholes – fining campaigns for incomplete reporting, or for taking shortcuts around spending limits – in the early months of a campaign season. But that ship sailed way too long ago to take the stink off the 2008 race.

“The time for setting the ground rules was earlier,” says Craig Holman, a lobbyist with the watchdog group Public Citizen. “There isn’t time to do much now.”

That’s especially true given the magnitude of what we’re dealing with here: the biggest pile of political contributions in the history of free elections, nearly a billion dollars given to presidential candidates in this season alone. Because the FEC has been dead in the water for so long, it’s likely that we’ll still be in the dark about a large chunk of this record manure pile of campaign contributions when we go to vote in November.

But that doesn’t mean that a little sifting through campaign records doesn’t tell us quite a lot about who’s backing whom in these races. The truth is that the campaigns of both Barack Obama and John McCain are being inundated with cash from more or less exactly the same gorgons of the corporate scene. From Wall Street to the Big Oil powerhouses to the military-industrial complex, America’s fat-cat business leaders know that the Animal House-style party of the last eight years that made almost all of them rich with bonuses, government contracts and bubble profits is about to come to an end, and someone is going to have to pay to clean up the mess. They want that someone to be you, not them, and they’ve spared no expense to make sure both presidential candidates will be there to bail them out next year.

They’re succeeding. Both would-be presidents have already sold us out. They’ve taken the money and run – completing the cyclical transformation of the American political narrative from one of monopolistic Republican iniquity to an even more depressing tale about the overweening power of corporate money and the essentially fictitious nature of our two-party system.

In layman’s terms, we’ve gone from being screwed to being fucked. Who knows – maybe Barack Obama will surprise us if he wins the election. But if you look at the money, it doesn’t look good.

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