How Bombs Built by Raytheon in Tucson Killed 31 Civilians in Yemen

In a historic vote, the US Senate passed a resolution on Thursday calling for an end to US military and financial support for the Saudi-led war on Yemen. This represents the first time in US history the Senate has voted to withdraw military forces from an unauthorized war using the War Powers Resolution. The Saudi-led war in Yemen has created what the UN calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, with 14 million of Yemen’s 28 million people on the brink of famine. A remarkable piece in this week’s New York Times Magazine traces how bombs built by Raytheon in Tucson, Arizona, made its way into the Saudi arsenal and then were dropped on Yemeni villages. The article centers on what happened in the remote village of Arhab when US-backed Saudi warplanes carried out a series of bombings on September 10, 2016. According to Human Rights Watch, at least 31 civilians were killed, three of them children; 42 people were injured. We speak to journalist Jeffrey Stern.

AMY GOODMAN: In a historic vote, the US Senate passed a resolution Thursday calling for an end to US military and financial support for the Saudi-led war on Yemen. This represents the first time in US history the Senate has voted to withdraw military forces from an unauthorized war using the War Powers Act. The vote, 56 to 41. But the bill is not expected to pass the House, at least this year. The vote came as peace talks in Sweden resulted in a ceasefire in the strategic port city of Hodeidah that’s scheduled to go into effect at midnight. The Saudi-led war on Yemen has created what the UN calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, with more than half of Yemen’s 28 million people on the brink of famine. A recent report by Save the Children estimates 85,000 children under the age of 5 have died from acute malnutrition brought on by the war.

We end today’s show looking at a remarkable piece in…

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