The Rape of Afghanistan

The rape of young boys in Afghanistan by our “allies” is getting a
lot
of press
attention
these days, provoked by the revelation that US military personnel
who tried to stop it are being disciplined for interfering. Two US officers
apparently beat up one of our pet warlords, who insisted on keeping a boy chained
to his bed as a sex slave: this kind of rough justice got one relieved of his
command and the other is being forced to retire.

The US military denies
ordering its personnel to look the other way, but this is a lie: why else would
they be discharging one of the Special Forces soldiers who beat up that Afghan
commander? If he didn’t disobey orders to ignore the practice then on what grounds
are they forcing him out?

Writing
in National Review, Mark Krikorian fulminates:

“While punishing our soldiers for roughing
up pedophile rapists is outrageous, the general policy that “allegations of
child sexual abuse by Afghan military or police personnel would be a matter
of domestic Afghan criminal law” (in the words of an Army spokesman) is unavoidable
given our policy of semi-colonization. If it were up to me, we’d wash our hands
of Afghanistan, making clear that if the Taliban (or whichever armed gang manages
to take power) makes the mistake of again serving as a safe haven and training
ground for people planning to attack the United States, we’ll come back and
kill a bunch of them again. But that until that day, and that day may never
come, they’re on their own and are free to go on raping their children, if that’s
what their primitive and barbarous culture calls for.”

Krikorian goes on to pose another alternative: go all out and “simply colonize
the place.” While he acknowledges this isn’t going to happen — after all, “that’s
never worked out well in Afghanistan” — “it would have the advantage of allowing
us to impose our (objectively superior) standards on them.” Citing the example
of the British suppression of suttee in India, the practice
of burning Indian women on their husbands’ funeral pyres, he concludes with
a slap at “semi-colonization,” which he says “is forcing us to tolerate the
depraved norms of this savage culture without any authority to change them.”

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