The Great Brexit Disorder

Photo by ijclark | CC BY 2.0

Seeking, and being able to afford (!), a brief psychological decompression from the nightmarish Land of Caged Toddlers, and the almost daily police executions of unarmed blacks, I’m back in the UK, where things are marginally less worse, depending of course on the stratum of society to which one happens to belong.

In Blighty, not quite as yet a banana republic like the US, young children are not (so far) kidnapped on a massive scale by the state, and its non-whites (so far) only generally endure systemic and repetitive police harassment and beatings, albeit, relative to the US, with the very occasional police killing thrown in.

The burning issue in the UK, where immigration is concerned, consists in the subsequent denial of the right of residence to those who entered the country entirely legally.

The recent scandal concerning the so-called “Windrush generation” is a central instance of this official duplicity.

The British Nationality Act was passed in 1948 to allow British Commonwealth citizens legal entry into the UK, as a way of dealing with the country’s acute postwar labour shortage.  Only proof of residency in a Commonwealth country was needed for entry.

The steamship Windrush brought the first of several thousands of immigrants from the British Caribbean to the UK.

In a government “paper reduction” exercise decades later, the entry papers of these immigrants were shredded (other euphemisms were used, but this is basically…

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