Seventy-Three Years Later, Nagasaki Survivor Warns Against Nuclear Warfare

Seventy-three years ago today, on August 9, 1945, the US dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Nagasaki, killing 74,000 people and forever changing the lives of those who survived the nuclear attack. The bombing came just three days after the US dropped the world’s first atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, killing some 140,000 people. For more we speak with two guests who traveled from Japan to New York City on the Peace Boat — an international boat that sails around the world campaigning for nuclear disarmament and world peace — last month. Terumi Kuramori is a hibakusha — that’s the Japanese word for a survivor of the atomic bomb — and Tatsuya Yoshioka is the co-founder and director of the Peace Boat.

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, Democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman with Nermeen Shaikh.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: Seventy-three years ago today on August 9th, 1945, the US dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Nagasaki, killing 74,000 people and forever changing the lives of those who survived the nuclear attack. The destruction was massive, as shock waves, radiation and heat rays coursed throughout the city. This came just three days after the US dropped the world’s first atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, killing some 140,000 people.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, just a few weeks ago, we were joined in studio by two guests who traveled from Japan to New York City on the Peace Boat, an international boat that sails around the world campaigning for nuclear disarmament and world peace. The cofounder and director of the Peace Boat, Tatsuya Yoshioka and Terumi Kuramori, a hibakusha — that’s the Japanese word for a survivor of the atomic bomb — joined us in our studios to talk about the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. I started by asking Terumi Kuramori to describe what happened when that second atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki 73 years ago today.

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