Scaramucci Out, Kelly in: Beltway Praises Another "New Sheriff in Town" — but Don't Get Too Used to Him Either

(2nd L-R) Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, White House Director of Strategic Initiatives Chris Liddell and Chief Strategist Steve Bannon wait for the arrival of President Donald Trump before a meeting about cyber security in the Roosevelt Room at the White House January 31, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, White House Director of Strategic Initiatives Chris Liddell and Chief Strategist Steve Bannon wait for the arrival of President Trump before a meeting about cyber security in the Roosevelt Room at the White House, January 31, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

There’s nothing quite like the breathless excitement of Beltway pundits at the prospect of a manly father figure striding into town to whip the political system into shape. CNN’s Gloria Borger must have said “there’s a new sheriff in town” at least 467 times in the space of one afternoon after the news that the colorful White House communications adviser of just 10 days, Anthony “the Mooch” Scaramucci, was out on his ear at the hands of the new White House chief of staff General John Kelly.

The thrill of having a swashbuckling military man bringing the hammer down on his very first day brought mainstream media commentators to the kind of collective swoon we haven’t seen since President Trump hired Gens. H.R McMaster and James “Mad Dog” Mattis a few months back and everyone declared that the grownups were back in charge.

Ben Domenech of the Federalist explained on “Face the Nation” on Sunday that Kelly’s hire is a turning point. Normally this would lead to a prediction that Trump is finally going to “pivot,” but by now everyone seems to realize that the president is incapable of “pivoting” to anything resembling presidential behavior. Never mind that; Domenech has a new pivot theory:

 It’s potentially a turning point in the early stages of this administration, a pivot away from perhaps loyalty to a GOP establishment which had been injected into this White House after a campaign in which they were very often at odds.

On CNN, GOP strategist Mark Caputo gave the official Beltway line:

I’ve known the president for quite a while now, several years. And I know that he responds very, very well to flag officers. It’s a group of people that he’s very…

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