No One Knows What Will Happen Now to Separated Migrant Children

The government has no plans to reunite thousands of children who have been separated from their parents at the border, despite President Trump’s executive order claiming to end family separations. We speak with Zenén Jaimes, advocacy director for the Texas Civil Rights Project. He is part of their team that goes to the federal courthouse in McAllen each day since Trump began his “zero tolerance” policy, and collects information from parents who had their children taken away from them before they were taken to court to face criminal charges for crossing the border.

AMY GOODMAN: “How Long, How Long Blues,” the legendary singer Barbara Dane, performing yesterday in our Democracy Now! studios. Tonight, she’s performing at Joe’s Pub in her first New York City show in 15 years. May 12th was her 91st birthday. This is Democracy Now! I’m Amy Goodman with Nermeen Shaikh.

NERMEEN SHAIKH: We go now to McAllen, Texas, where we’re joined by Zenén Jaimes, who is the advocacy director for the Texas Civil Rights Project. He is part of their team that goes to the federal courthouse in McAllen each day since Trump began his “zero tolerance” policy and collects information from parents who had their children taken away from them before they were taken to court to face criminal charges for crossing the border. So Zenén, can you talk about your response to the executive order and what you have learned from the parents who you have spoken to at the courthouse?

ZENÉN JAIMES: Thank you so much for having me on. I think your guest already hit the nail on the head. This is for us no solution to what the crisis is actually happening. Now since the “zero tolerance” policy was announced, we knew that McAllen and South Texas was going to be ground zero, because this is where we are seeing most of the crossings as well as asylum-seekers.

And so since the end of May to today, we have interviewed over 350 people and done intake with them. And these are people who have…

Read more