Hillary Clinton's Not-So-New, Not-So-Worker-Friendly Economic Plan

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Hillary Clinton’s economic plan reads a lot like the policies of the Bill Clinton administration — and Clintonomics repurposed many of the GOP proposals that came before it. (Photo: Ronald Woan / Flickr)

Hillary Clinton is having a lot of fun taking shots at Donald Trump’s economic plan to make America “great” again. She calls it an extreme version of the Republicans’ failed theory of trickle-down economics.

The Trump plan would, of course, be a disaster for working people — and another windfall for the rich, with its proposals for eliminating the estate tax and opening up new tax loopholes for the wealthy.

But Clinton’s own economic plan isn’t very new, much less positive for working people. It reads a lot like the policies of the Bill Clinton administration — and while Hillary denounces the failed Republican policies recycled by Trump, the truth is Clintonomics repurposed many of the GOP proposals that came before it.

Providing targeted tax breaks to corporations, cutting “red tape” and doing away with regulations on business were all hallmarks of the Clinton-era policies that successfully made a break from the Democrats’ past image of the party of social welfare spending.

And no matter what she says on the campaign trail to appeal for votes, a new Clinton administration — like the Clinton administration she served in the 1990s — will have little to offer in the way of policies to improve the lives of working-class Americans. But when it comes to Corporate America — well, that’s a different story.

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At a stop on the Clinton campaign’s “jobs tour,” the candidate addressed reporters at the Futuramic plant in Detroit, where they make nose cones for the F-35 fighter plane.

The choice of a manufacturer of parts for the U.S. military as the site of her speech sent a little message about what Clinton has in store in terms of her administration’s spending priorities.

But beyond that, Clinton had a message to send to her supporters in the corporate boardroom:

And here’s…

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