Facebook Will Review Nude Photos to ‘Stop Revenge Porn’

Facebook explained in more detail its new test for combating revenge porn following mass confusion over how exactly the system works and whether it puts users at a higher risk for abuse. The system, currently being piloted in Australia in partnership with the country’s eSafety Commissioner, allows users to upload nude photos preemptively directly to Facebook Messenger, so the company can create a digital fingerprint of sorts for the file to then prevent it from being uploaded maliciously in the future.

Because the pilot test was reported first by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, with no input from Facebook itself, many users found the notion of uploading their own nude photos directly to the social network a bit unsettling. While the initial report made clear that it was not in fact counter-productive and gave Facebook the means to track the files across its network, many people still walked away from the story bewildered.

Now, Facebook is clarifying how the system works via a blog post from Antigone Davis, the company’s global head of safety. First, a user must decide to upload the image or video they fear may be used by a malicious third-party, like a vindictive ex partner or an online harasser. This has a necessary risk built in, but “it’s a risk we are trying to balance against the serious, real-world harm that occurs every day when people (mostly women) can’t stop NCII from being posted,” Facebook security chief Alex Stamos explained on…

Read more