As Trump Complains About Alleged Surveillance, Republicans Gut Internet Privacy Rules

On Tuesday, the House narrowly voted to allow internet providers to sell your web browsing history and other personal information. The vote will give companies like Verizon, Comcast and AT&T more power to collect people’s sensitive data, including their internet browsing history, and to sell this information. Last week, the Senate also approved the measure in a vote largely split across party lines. President Trump is expected to sign the bill. For more, we speak to Laura Moy, deputy director of the Center on Privacy and Technology at the Georgetown University Law Center.

TRANSCRIPT

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman, as we end today’s show looking at the future of internet privacy, following Tuesday’s vote in the House to allow internet providers to sell your web browsing history and other personal information. By a vote of 215 to 205, the House passed a bill to overturn the Federal Communications Commission’s landmark broadband privacy rules established under the Obama administration. The vote will give companies like Verizon, Comcast and AT&T more power to collect people’s sensitive data, including your internet browsing history, as well as to sell that information. Last week, the Senate also approved the measure in a vote largely split across party lines. President Trump is expected to sign the bill.

For more, we go to Washington to speak with Laura Moy, deputy director of the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown University Law Center. Her new piece for The Daily Dot is titled “Think you can protect your privacy from internet providers without FCC rules? Good luck.”

Laura Moy, welcome to Democracy Now!

LAURA MOY: Thanks.

AMY GOODMAN: Talk about the significance of the House vote yesterday.

LAURA MOY: Right. Thank you. Thanks so much for having me on.

Right. I mean, strange days in Washington. At a time when Americans overwhelmingly want more privacy protection, yesterday the House of…

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