MSM attacks multivitamins in yet another example of quack science

Mike Adams

Today the mainstream media is gleefully reporting findings they mistakenly believe show all multivitamins to be worthless at preventing disease. “Case Closed: Multivitamins Should Not Be Used,” declares Forbes. “New studies dispel multivitamin myths,” reports NBC News. And CBS News shouts, “case is closed” after studies find no health benefits.”

The problem with all these headlines is they’re based on an editorial published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, a pro-pharma publication almost entirely funded by pharmaceuticals which compete with multivitamins. When I visited the study publication page on Annals.org, I was immediately greeted with a pop-up advertisement trying to hawk a pharmaceutical drug.

It’s almost as if the pharma-funded publication is saying, “Here, while we trash the reputation of vitamins, why don’t you buy some drugs from our sponsors?”

Why pharmaceuticals are never subjected to the same scrutiny as multivitamins

What the media doesn’t report, of course, is that if pharmaceuticals were subjected to the same basic questions covered in this study – do multivitamins enhance cognitive function? Do they prevent heart disease? – pharmaceuticals would prove to be disastrous. They not only don’t work; they also might kill you in the process of not working.

So why isn’t the media reporting that the “case is closed” on how drugs and medications fail to prevent chronic degenerative disease?

The answer is because this scrutiny is reserved solely for nutritional supplements. In today’s distorted system of quack medicine, junk science and pro-pharma propaganda, medications never have to be proven effective to be promoted and hyped. There is no scientific evidence whatsoever, for example, that chemotherapy prevents the progression of cancer (chemo actually causes more cancer), or that statin drugs enhance lifespan. There is no evidence whatsoever that ADHD drugs create healthy children or that antidepressants cure depression. Yet all these drugs are heavily hyped by medical journal (i.e. “drug journals”) and the mainstream media without regard for their disastrous lack of efficacy and safety.

So there’s a dangerous double standard in all this. Nobody asks whether drugs actually create health, but multivitamins are routinely subjected to intense scrutiny on this very question.

Studies were contrived through the use of synthetic vitamins

To make sure these multivitamin studies fail to produce positive results, these studies are universally structured so that they are based on cheap, low-grade, synthetic vitamins and inorganic minerals. Not coincidentally, these brands of low-grade multivitamins are actually manufactured by companies owned by pharmaceutical interests. They really do have a financial incentive to make multivitamins look bad, and so their multivitamin formulations are intentionally designed to fail.

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