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Home / Top Headlines / Las Vegas Bans Google Glasses
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Las Vegas Bans Google Glasses

Carly Page

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Google Glass has been prospectively banned in more places ahead of its release, as its surveillance capabilities trigger more concerns.

While some thought news of a Seattle bar banning Google Glass was little more than a PR stunt, it seems not, as yet more firms have preemptively declared that they will not allow their customers to wear the funny looking spectacles.

If you’re thinking of wearing your expensive Google Glass eyewear in Las Vegas, think again. NBC reports that casinos and strip clubs won’t allow the device to be worn on their premises because of its photographic capabilities.

Peter Feinstein, managing partner of the Sapphire Gentlemen’s Club in Las Vegas told NBC News, “We’ve been dealing with the cellphone videoing and the picture taking over the years and we are quick to make sure that that doesn’t happen in the club.

“As the sale of Google Glass spreads, there’ll be more people using them and wanting to use them at places such as a gentlemen’s club. If we see those in the club, we would do the same thing that we do to people who bring cameras into the club.” We’re assuming that this means, in simple terms, that if you’re wearing Google Glass you’re not getting in.

MGM resorts, which owns a number of Las Vegas hotels including The Mirage and The Excalibur, has also made known its view on Google Glass. Unsurprisingly, it doesn’t like the technology either.

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