21st December 2014                                                                                                                                                        
Home / Editorials / Jimmy Savile’s Police Contacts To Be Investigated
savile

Jimmy Savile’s Police Contacts To Be Investigated

RINF Alternative News

savile

West Yorkshire Police has launched a probe into social visits made by on-duty police officers who attended weekly ‘Friday Morning Club’ parties at Jimmy Savile’s penthouse flat in leeds, for over 20 years.

Savile had boasted about having protection from police friends who would destroy complaints made about the disgraced star.

In October the police force denied that it had any information about officers visiting Savile’s parties, saying that officers “were free to do what they wished when off duty”.

However they’ve now changed their tune, a spokeswoman has said:  “We are now carrying out further inquiries to obtain a better understanding of the circumstances surrounding the contact between West Yorkshire Police officers and Savile at the so called Friday Morning Breakfast Club.

“Local officers working in the community were invited by Savile to his home for a coffee.

“At that time the force was encouraging community officers to interact more with residents in their area. The officers usually visited on a Friday. It was usual for other friends of Savile to be present drinking coffee and chatting.”

Now retired inspector Mick Starkey and Sergeant Matthew Appleyard, who currently works in Wetherby, are among the club regulars who will now face questioning, although the official stance is that there is no suggestion attendees were aware that Savile was a pedophile.

Why RINF is different... And why you need to watch this...

RINF not only delivers the info you're not supposed to know, but also provides 100% free solution based videos and articles designed to help you to :

  • Improve your overall health
  • Get more financial independence
  • Stay informed & ahead of the curve
  • Become less dependent on corporations