Establishment Protecting Corporations From The Law

Mick Meaney
RINF Alternative News

The Serious Organised Crime Agency (Soca) has yet again turned a blind eye to law breaking, allowing corporations to hack and steal personal information from members of the public and business rivals, it has emerged.

Six years ago Soca became aware that telecoms giants, insurance companies and law firms were engaging in illegal activity by “routinely” employing private investigators to obtain sensitive data, including the use of telephone interception specialists who would physically attach real-time listening devices to a targets landline.

Corporations have also obtained personal information by calling the NHS, councils, Customs, banks, HM Revenue and utility providers.

According to The Independent, Tom Watson, Labour MP, said:

“What is astonishing about this whole murky affair is that Soca had knowledge of massive illegal invasions of privacy in the newspaper industry — but also in the supply chains of so-called blue-chip companies.

“I believe they are sitting on physical evidence that has still not been disclosed fully to forensic investigators at the Metropolitan Police. The law should also be rigorously applied to other sectors that have got away with it.”

The Labour MP Keith Vaz, chairman of the Home Affairs Select Committee, said:

“I am deeply concerned about these revelations. I will be seeking an explanation from Soca as to why this was not told to the Committee when we took evidence from them about the issue of private investigators.

“It is important that we establish how widespread this practice was and why no action was taken to stop what amounted to criminal activity of the worst kind.”

In an attempt to defend itself, a Soca spokesman said:

“Soca produced a confidential report in 2008 on the issue of licensing the private investigation industry. This report remains confidential and Soca does not comment on leaked documents or specific criminal investigations. Information is shared with other partners as required.”

It’s not the first time Soca has come under fire.

In 2012 they were criticised for ignoring dossiers of evidence that proved multimillion-pound international fraud in a criminal conspiracy that resulted in the death of a witness in “unexplained circumstances”.

These latest revelations continue to prove that the British public is justified in its mistrust of the establishment, which ultimately  protects corporate interests over those of British citizens, and the law.