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Humane Officer Guns Down Kittens in Front of Kids

WTSP
June 12, 2013

The Ohio Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals wants Humane Officer Barry Accorti fired for allegedly shooting five kittens in a home’s back yard on Monday.

OSPCA Executive Director Teresa Landon says Accorti should be fired and charged with five counts of animal cruelty.

Accorti retired as a sergeant with the North Ridgeville Police Department a few years ago and was hired as a part-time humane officer with the department.

Police tell WKYC that Accorti did not work Tuesday, but will be back on Wednesday.

Accorti responded to a home Monday afternoon where a feral mother cat and her five kittens were living in a woodpile.

He allegedly told the homeowner that shelters were full and that the cats would be going to kitty heaven. He then pulled out his gun and shot the five, 8- to 10-week-old kittens.

Accorti allegedly told the homeowner that he isn’t supposed to do this, but it was justifiable. The woman ran into the house to shield her children, who were screaming and crying.

City officials tell WKYC that they are looking into what the proper protocol is for such a situation.

Just before 5 p.m., the police chief released a statement regarding the incident:

“On 6-10-2013, a resident on Vista Lake Way contacted NRPD on Facebook regarding a “family of cats” that had made a home in their wood pile. The resident went on to ask if the humane officer would pick them up or would they have to deal with the issue themselves.”

“Within twenty minutes NRPD responded back to the resident on Facebook stating that Humane Officer (HO) Accorti would be there shortly. Upon arrival HO Accorti (who has thirty plus years of law enforcement experience) was shown the wood pile where the feral cats were located. The wood piles were located next to a concrete patio approximately ten feet from the residence. The homeowner advised that the feral cats were causing flea problems within the residence, a foul odor, and leaving deceased wildlife in her yard.”

“The homeowner was advised that, due to her safety concerns (proximity of wood pile to house, number of children at the residence, diseases feral cats can develop, fleas, unsanitary conditions), assistance could be rendered but the cats would be euthanized. The complainant agreed to accept assistance and the officer started to dismantle the wood pile.”

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