Police files reveal ‘endemic corruption’ at the Met

Documents show how organised crime networks were able to infiltrate the force ‘at will’ 

Scotland Yard holds an astonishing 260 crates of documents on police corruption in one corner of London alone — and very few of the rogue detectives have ever been successfully prosecuted. 

A review led by one of Britain’s most senior police officers has unearthed a mammoth amount of intelligence spawned by Operation Tiberius, a secret police report written in 2002 that concluded there was “endemic corruption” inside the Metropolitan Police. 

The file found organised crime networks in north-east London were able to infiltrate the Met “at will” to frustrate the criminal justice system. 

The huge number of crates, revealed in a letter by Craig Mackey, the Met’s deputy commissioner, indicates the scale of criminality inside Scotland Yard’s north-east London units, which appears to have gone almost unchallenged since Tiberius was compiled 12 years ago. 

Research suggests that only a tiny number of the scores of then-serving and former police officers named as corrupt by Tiberius have been convicted. 

In a letter to Keith Vaz, chairman of the Home Affairs Committee, Mr Mackey warned that the mountain of evidence against his officers is likely to continue growing. He said: “This number [of crates] is likely to expand as linked operations are identified.” 

Following a series of scandals surrounding the Stephen Lawrence and Daniel Morgan murders, the news will renew fears that the Met remains unwilling to confront corruption in its ranks. 

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